May 23, 2015 at 11:31AM and here is the latest weather for Birch Run,Michigan. http://t.co/Ce67OueCMW #birchrun #michigan

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May 23, 2015 at 11:31AM
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Virtual reality’s roller coaster ride to the mainstream

AIVAnet

In the early ’90s, four odd-looking arcade games appeared at a rented-out store in my local mall. For about seven dollars, anyone could stop in and play three minutes of a new virtual reality game called Dactyl Nightmare. I paid up, put on the massive helmet… and then the game was over before I’d even figured out what I was doing in the blocky, chessboard-like environment. The whole experience left a lot to be desired and I never went back. It certainly wasn’t the first VR experience (or the most advanced) made available for public consumption, but it sums up how many felt about the ill-fated, first wave of consumer-facing VR projects: all hype and not enough substance. The times and technology have changed, though, and it’s finally time for round two. VR systems are being developed and promoted at a rate that outstrips the previous era, with better…

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Dealing With Cops: The Latest How-To Book

By Brennan DuBose

Attorney Eric Broyles has one goal: “I want to keep black men and boys alive.”

“Encounters With Police: A Black Man’s Guide to Survival,” a book written by Broyles and his colleague of 20 years, veteran police patrolman Adrian Jackson, is the result of that goal.

The book, which Broyles says was inspired by “anger,” is dedicated to numerous slain, unarmed black males such as Michael Brown, Oscar Grant, and Sean Bell. Broyles also includes in the dedication an acknowledgement of the “countless” black men and boys who died during encounters with police. He concludes the dedication with Trayvon Martin, the black teen who did not die during a police encounter, but who Broyles believes started a movement.

“Trayvon is an example of what the broader American society values… George had the right to have a gun and Trayvon didn’t have the right to have his fist.”

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